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About

LANDR (landr.com) is a platform where creators can make, master, and distribute their music. By providing high-caliber tools and meaningful connections (via LANDR Network), LANDR is the hub for independent minded creators with high standards for their music and projects. Founded in 2014 on its keystone automated mastering product, LANDR ...

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Publicist
Alex Ward
(646) 921-0487

Current News

  • 01/28/201501/28/2015

People-Powered Code: How LANDR Sparks New Uses for a Tried-and-True Music Production Process by Tying Algorithm to Community

Instant online mastering is responding to more musicians’ needs, thanks to input from users like Of Montreal’s Bennett Lewis and the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir

When community manager Rory Seydel joined LANDR, he discovered that on top of his job to blog about and engage with the musicians using LANDR to master their audio tracks, he would be working on customer support. At first, Seydel was surprised, “but then I saw that customer support was the key to the...

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News

01/28/2015, People-Powered Code: How LANDR Sparks New Uses for a Tried-and-True Music Production Process by Tying Algorithm to Community
01/28/201501/28/2015, People-Powered Code: How LANDR Sparks New Uses for a Tried-and-True Music Production Process by Tying Algorithm to Community
Announcement
01/28/2015
Announcement
01/28/2015
When community manager Rory Seydel joined LANDR, he discovered that on top of his job to blog about and engage with the musicians using LANDR to master their audio tracks, he would be working on customer support. MORE» More»

Instant online mastering is responding to more musicians’ needs, thanks to input from users like Of Montreal’s Bennett Lewis and the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir

When community manager Rory Seydel joined LANDR, he discovered that on top of his job to blog about and engage with the musicians using LANDR to master their audio tracks, he would be working on customer support. At first, Seydel was surprised, “but then I saw that customer support was the key to the community,” he recalls. “Especially when the website was down, I began to hear about all sorts of different uses by all sorts of different musicians and producers.”

User feedback pointed to striking stories: Grateful Dead guitarist and founding member Bob Weir uses LANDR to master the prolific output of his studio, where a shifting cast of musicians gather regularly to jam in free-spirited collaboration. A London-based DJ’s high LANDR traffic—he mastered thousands of tracks in a handful of days—set off the service’s alarms, until Seydel discovered he was madly mastering a huge back catalog of dub plates, old dub remixes cut straight to vinyl.

“None of this would have been possible,” notes Seydel, “if these artists had had to book a studio and an engineer.”

LANDR’s reasonable price point and automated ease have done more than enable musicmakers with a lot of material or with a limited budget to get their work in sparkling final form. It has changed the way musicians and producers use the mastering stage of production, from a no-turning-back polish of final mixes, to an evolving feedback loop, a litmus test to judge a track or mix.

This is exactly how Of Montreal guitarist Bennett Lewis uses LANDR: To get a better idea of what’s working and what’s not in his mixes. “You create this song, mix it the best you can,” says Lewis, “and you get it to a point when you say, ‘This sounds good. I am going to send it to LANDR and let them do their thing’. When you get a master back you realize, ‘Oh wait, it was a long way from done.’”

“It’s like an objective set of ears,” explains Seydel, “that allows you to hear how the mix really sounds. You can go back and adjust your mix, or even rework your material.”

Meanwhile, LANDR’s A.I.-based approach learns, too, gaining more and more insight into what musicians from different genres want, by referencing a growing database of more than 800,000 past tracks. It could be a “hotter” file for an EDM artist or something a little lower in volume for a country track. Yet the bulk of this insight comes from human input and interaction, as users tell the LANDR team what’s working and what isn’t. “If we get a consensus in a genre, that’s what we try,” Seydel says. “A lot of what we do is based on user feedback. Then we make changes and get another round of feedback. There’s constant fine-tuning.”

“An algorithm is never just an algorithm, never just a bunch of code,” explains Seydel. “It’s the community around it that makes it alive, that makes it a real boon for musicians.” An automated mastering service has to have a serious human side: It has to learn to embrace genre difference, to grasp the subtleties, and deliver the clear beauty that sets mastered tracks apart from raw recordings. “This could never happen without people,” Seydel states.

Announcement
01/28/2015

01/14/2015, Mastering in All Directions: Cloud-Based LANDR Embeds in 15 Countries
01/14/201501/14/2015, Mastering in All Directions: Cloud-Based LANDR Embeds in 15 Countries
Announcement
01/14/2015
Announcement
01/14/2015
The LANDR Embeddable Platform exemplifies the global and field-leveling nature of the LANDR community, which is about much more than sound engineering. MORE» More»

Less than one percent of music recordings ever get mastered, a process that gives audio a higher-quality sound across diverse listening situations. Cloud-based mastering tool LANDR (www.landr.com) is changing this at an explosive rate. In their first six months since launch in May 2014, the technology has mastered over 500,000 tracks and, on a per month basis, is now mastering more tracks per month than all the traditional mastering studios in the United States combined.  That pace is set to explode this month as they announce partnerships of the LANDR Embeddable Platform with partners in over a dozen countries, from America to China.

The LANDR Embeddable Platform exemplifies the global and field-leveling nature of the LANDR community, which is about much more than sound engineering.

“There’s known to be 160 million musicians in the world concentrated in 20 countries,” explains CEO Pascal Pilon. “When you look at the statistics on where music equipment is being sold, after the U.S. and Japan, come the rising forces of China, Brazil, and India. The problem is that the know-how needed to do quality music production is concentrated in a small number of places. LANDR is a step towards a world where any composer with a phone and an Internet connection will be capable of making what they capture sound full and engaging. We are unlocking a market of tens of millions of recording artists.”

LANDR is rolling out the embeddable platform with over 20 distribution companies, allowing artists to master their tracks through their trusted gateways to online retailers and streaming services, including:

  • Tunecore (U.S.)
  • JTV Digital (France)
  • Music Kickup (Sweden)
  • Ditto Music (U.K.)
  • Routenote (U.K.)
  • La Cupula Music (Spain)
  • Record Union (Sweden)
  • Xiami (China)
  • Onepeace Music (Japan)

 
“We are in the business of artificial intelligence for music production,” explains co-founder of VP of Product Justin Evans. “The same way Shazam breaks a song into component features and tells you what song it is, LANDR understands many variables about your uploaded song and applies the appropriate kinds of mastering instantly.”

But LANDR is not solely about lowering the cost and increasing the accessibility of mastering. Diverse musicians are uniting around LANDR as a community, since the most innovative composers are adopting this tech-savvy approach. New use cases are emerging, whether they are prolific songwriters revisiting archives of unmastered tracks and listening with new ears or musicians in the developing world that can hear their songs as a finished product for the first time. Some artists use the LANDR mastering process to “preview” a song while they are midway through mixing.

One part-time electronic beats maker quit his software job when he found he could sell four times as many beats once he started using LANDR before uploading his tracks to online marketplaces. Sound engineers are even getting in on the action, using LANDR to give themselves a sonic head start.

LANDR’s announcement of partnership distributors embedding their platform in 20 countries will only continue to grow this community of artists who rarely had access to making their music sound as good as possible through mastering.

“What PayPal did for managing payments, we’re doing for the world of sounds,” concludes Pilon about the LANDR Embeddable Platform. “We are not just freeing people with less money. We are giving more freedom to composers and producers to do what they do best.”

Announcement
01/14/2015